Best Setup for $5,000?

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sonotony

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Best Setup for $5,000?

PostTue Sep 03, 2013 5:25 pm

Hello All!

I need to get set up to do some basic, yet professional looking film work. Some will be for projection on a large movie screen, some for DVD's and some for HD web video. The problem is that I only have about $5,000 to spend (I can go as high as $6,000) and I'm almost starting from scratch.

Until recently, most of the work I have done has been is web or DVD based. My products (training, promo & music videos, etc) have typically involved either professional film crews or heavy use of animation or post production processing to the extent that raw footage quality has rarely become an issue. In many cases where I have been able to use a professional camera crew, I have supplemented projects with purchased stock footage and/or used my JVC Enviro (~$1,000 consumer HD camcorder) to fill in some small pieces.

I am currently putting together a documentary as part of a larger project and need the documentary portion to be as high quality as possible using the ~$5,000 equipment budget available for this portion of the project. No, I am not a professional film maker, just a professional who needs to make a film. However, if this movie turns out well, it should afford me the opportunity to do more film work within my projects, which is what I would really like to do more of. I want my finished product to be good enough to show on a movie screen. I'm great with post production stuff and I'm a fast learner for the rest. I just want to make sure I have the optimal combination of equipment to get me where I want to go. Is this even possible for 5,000? If so, I'd appreciate any ideas.

With the exception of some Nikon camera lenses (low budget lens solution?), a Zoom H4N, 3 cheap handheld mics, 2 unreliable lav mics, my JVC Enviro with 4 bad pixels, and 3 cheap tripods, I've got nothing. I need to be able to film studio style interviews and location footage including some scenery. I'm not sure what to do about the interview footage because I want to use two camera angles. Is there an ultra cheap option for interview cam #2? Like I said, I don't know how possible this is. At a minimum, It looks like I will need:

two acceptable quality lav mics

one acceptable quality boom setup

shoulder/handheld rig setup

tripod setup

wide angle lens

telephoto/zoom lens

solution for interview cam #2

I'm not sure if I should get the BMCC-MFT, BMCC-EF, or BMPCC. I think the first two will allow me greater editing flexibility, but do I need the cheaper camera to afford better glass? I greatly appreciate any tips, hints, resources, ideas or suggestions! THANKS!
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rick.lang

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostThu Sep 05, 2013 6:35 pm

sonotony wrote:... I am currently putting together a documentary as part of a larger project and need the documentary portion to be as high quality as possible using the ~$5,000 equipment budget available for this portion of the project... I want my finished product to be good enough to show on a movie screen... Is this even possible for 5,000? If so, I'd appreciate any ideas.

With the exception of some Nikon camera lenses (low budget lens solution?), a Zoom H4N, 3 cheap handheld mics, 2 unreliable lav mics, my JVC Enviro with 4 bad pixels, and 3 cheap tripods, I've got nothing. I need to be able to film studio style interviews and location footage including some scenery. I'm not sure what to do about the interview footage because I want to use two camera angles. Is there an ultra cheap option for interview cam #2? Like I said, I don't know how possible this is. At a minimum, It looks like I will need:

two acceptable quality lav mics

one acceptable quality boom setup

shoulder/handheld rig setup

tripod setup

wide angle lens

telephoto/zoom lens

solution for interview cam #2

I'm not sure if I should get the BMCC-MFT, BMCC-EF, or BMPCC. I think the first two will allow me greater editing flexibility, but do I need the cheaper camera to afford better glass? I greatly appreciate any tips, hints, resources, ideas or suggestions! THANKS!


I wonder if it is taking some time to receive a reply to your question because it is difficult to do everything you want within your budget. I think you need to prioritize your needs and discard what isn't absolutely necessary for your documentary. For instance, depending upon the nature of the documentary, you may be able to wait for the rig and even a good tripod as long as you work within the limitations of your cheap tripods, i.e. just stabilize the camera and don't worry about panning and tilting as you record video. I know it may seem boring but steady frames are desirable and moving the camera about can keep the image interesting.

You do need good audio and one or two good lenses or the right zoom as your only lens. The lens choice will come after you decide on the camera. Do you know how you will light your interviews? If you are completely free to locate your subjects, you may risk available and practical lights and just use something to bounce light as needed.

Although not ideal, if the two camera approach is necessary, you might go with two BMPCCs. But be careful because two cameras can take away from the intimacy of your interview if it is a single talking head. With one camera, your audience is seeing through that one lens as if they are talking with the subject. With two cameras, you remove the audience as being there personally. It may look great but it is not as intimate as the viewer's brain can't pretend they are conducting the interview. What I am saying is only true if the interviewer is never shown on camera, just your subject.

So before you buy two BMPCCs, you might consider the BMCC MFT with an adapter for your old Nikon lenses. All part of working within your limitations and concentrating on what is in front of the camera rather than a preconception of all the equipment that would be nice to have. If your documentary is successful, you can add equipment for the next one.

Rick Lang
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Iver Heen Ask

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostThu Sep 05, 2013 7:09 pm

Depends on the documentary style, but I wouldn't shoot a documentary without a proper tripod. (And there goes your budget... ;) )

If your Nikon glass is useable, I would say the same as the guy above: Go for your Nikon glass with an adapter on the MFT camera.

Remember that with a Blackmagic camera there are other accessories you'll need. Depends on your working environment, but you'll probably need at least two 480GB SSDs which would give almost 10 hours of shooting (in compressed format). And even if you are shooting in ProRes or DNxHD you'll need a lot of storage drives. Do you have a good computer to edit the footage?
You'll need a few batteries aswell.

With a budget of 5000 dollars you're going to sacrifice quality in most departments since you are starting from scratch.

Unless you are willing to use most of the equipment you already have, and just buy the camera plus important accessories and a good tripod, you'll just end up where you started.
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Disc2

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostThu Sep 05, 2013 9:20 pm

Tascam DR-60D 4-Channel Linear PCM Recorder - $349.99
Rode VideoMic Booming Kit - $169.00
Sennheiser ew 100 ENG G3 Wireless Microphone System Combo - $799.00
Complete with Sony Quick Release Shoulder Rig - $1200.00
EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Autofocus Lens for Select Digital SLR Cameras - $699.00
(Canon DSLR) or Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera - $995.00
Zacuto Z-Finder EVF - $749.00

Total $4960.99

Complete Shoulder Rig Setup Image
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Ryan Jones

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostFri Sep 06, 2013 1:06 am

Disc2 wrote:Tascam DR-60D 4-Channel Linear PCM Recorder - $349.99
Rode VideoMic Booming Kit - $169.00
Sennheiser ew 100 ENG G3 Wireless Microphone System Combo - $799.00
Complete with Sony Quick Release Shoulder Rig - $1200.00
EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Autofocus Lens for Select Digital SLR Cameras - $699.00
(Canon DSLR) or Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera - $995.00
Zacuto Z-Finder EVF - $749.00

Total $4960.99

Complete Shoulder Rig Setup Image

Almost - no sticks and OP wants two lavs.

I'd suggest posting this on a non-BM forum. There will likely be many other cameras you should consider before the BMD ones and given you have not much you may need to look at buying some stuff and renting a camera body.
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Will Tejeda

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostFri Sep 06, 2013 1:32 am

I think he should be a lil more realistic

Also didn't mention the lighting .... :S

Or memory cards/ storage

Or filters (at the very least he'll need some ND's and IR filter for shooting outdoors)

Or Batteries ....

You're going to have to accept the fact that "acceptable" might not work for everything in your budget..



With that said,

Dont think shoulder rig ... think base plate and rods .. (less than $150-300 range)

If you can get your hands on something like an Indisystem Utracompact range and under
http://www.indisystem.com/ultracompact-1/

But literally just something to help you steady the footage a bit..

Wireless lavs are cool and convenient, but unless you have $1200 you wont get a decent pair.

The rodes boom kit that was mentioned should be fine for you , but you could always just get the rod from the kit and pick up a ntg2 + Tascam DR40

some decent lights or battery powered leds will run you from 150-250 bucks

I'd recommend some pocket cams if it werent for the issues they're having , but for now you're best bet is to find some decently priced used 5d mkii cams, or go with some gh2's


that'll leave you enough $$ left over for some decent glass, filters, and batteries
Elias Tejeda
DP/Cinematographer
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sonotony

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 1:54 pm

rick.lang wrote:I wonder if it is taking some time to receive a reply to your question because it is difficult to do everything you want within your budget. I think you need to prioritize your needs and discard what isn't absolutely necessary for your documentary. For instance, depending upon the nature of the documentary, you may be able to wait for the rig and even a good tripod as long as you work within the limitations of your cheap tripods, i.e. just stabilize the camera and don't worry about panning and tilting as you record video. I know it may seem boring but steady frames are desirable and moving the camera about can keep the image interesting.

You do need good audio and one or two good lenses or the right zoom as your only lens. The lens choice will come after you decide on the camera. Do you know how you will light your interviews? If you are completely free to locate your subjects, you may risk available and practical lights and just use something to bounce light as needed.

Although not ideal, if the two camera approach is necessary, you might go with two BMPCCs. But be careful because two cameras can take away from the intimacy of your interview if it is a single talking head. With one camera, your audience is seeing through that one lens as if they are talking with the subject. With two cameras, you remove the audience as being there personally. It may look great but it is not as intimate as the viewer's brain can't pretend they are conducting the interview. What I am saying is only true if the interviewer is never shown on camera, just your subject.

So before you buy two BMPCCs, you might consider the BMCC MFT with an adapter for your old Nikon lenses. All part of working within your limitations and concentrating on what is in front of the camera rather than a preconception of all the equipment that would be nice to have. If your documentary is successful, you can add equipment for the next one.

Rick Lang
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Thanks for your input! :D

I hate being the noob asking the dumb questions which is why I try to absorb as much as possible by reading a lot before I ask. I like your point on the interviewing with just one camera. The thing is that one of the planned interviews is actually between two partners who are kind of interviewing each other in a conversation setting. Would it be too drastic if i just picked up an old GH1 on ebay for one of the camera angles? It's only a small part of the overall project and I don't want to invest too much here.

Once again, showing my ignorance here on lenses... It appears to me that a speedbooster can be used to basically double the quantity of primes in my bag. If I am starting out acquiring new lenses, would a speddbooster make sense, so I can plan to get two focal lengths out of each lens?

If you were to recommend two primes, what would they be (focal length, mount, brand, model... any ideas are helpful).

While I do not have any Canon lenses, I was considering a Canon speedbooster and getting some canon lenses. To me, there seems to be more activity in the Canon DSLR filming arena than Nikon (I see guys with Canon rigs all the time and never see Nikon rigs).

Also, I have a guy who will sell me a Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8 L REALLY cheap. Would this be a decent zoom lens to use (not planning on using much zoom, but I need to get used to using all/mostly primes). Would I need to do anything to modify this lens to make it usable for filming?

For lighting, I have a few well lit public places in mind, and will try bouncing light vs. depending too much on too much direct lighting.

Thanks again for your help and advice!
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sonotony

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 2:03 pm

iverha wrote:Depends on the documentary style, but I wouldn't shoot a documentary without a proper tripod. (And there goes your budget... ;) )

If your Nikon glass is useable, I would say the same as the guy above: Go for your Nikon glass with an adapter on the MFT camera.

Remember that with a Blackmagic camera there are other accessories you'll need. Depends on your working environment, but you'll probably need at least two 480GB SSDs which would give almost 10 hours of shooting (in compressed format). And even if you are shooting in ProRes or DNxHD you'll need a lot of storage drives. Do you have a good computer to edit the footage?
You'll need a few batteries aswell.

With a budget of 5000 dollars you're going to sacrifice quality in most departments since you are starting from scratch.

Unless you are willing to use most of the equipment you already have, and just buy the camera plus important accessories and a good tripod, you'll just end up where you started.


Yes, I know with only $5,000, I will sacrifice a lot. Like I said from the start, I don't even know if this is possible. Hopefully, I can make up the diference with style, creativity... and just good storytelling.

I have a decent computer and I can probably get a couple of the SSD's from another budget area, thus allowing me to spend more on actual camera stuff. If I went with the BMCC, do you know of a good (hopefully resonably priced), battery solution?

Also, do you have any advice on minimal acceptable tripod brands? Obviously, I can't go deluxe, but maybe I can start poking around ebay and some local filmmaker communities.

Thanks!
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sonotony

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 2:07 pm

Disc2 wrote:Tascam DR-60D 4-Channel Linear PCM Recorder - $349.99
Rode VideoMic Booming Kit - $169.00
Sennheiser ew 100 ENG G3 Wireless Microphone System Combo - $799.00
Complete with Sony Quick Release Shoulder Rig - $1200.00
EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Autofocus Lens for Select Digital SLR Cameras - $699.00
(Canon DSLR) or Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera - $995.00
Zacuto Z-Finder EVF - $749.00

Total $4960.99

Complete Shoulder Rig Setup Image


Very nice and helpful. Doesn't get me there 100%, but I don't need the Tascam. I know I'll have to be creative in some areas, but I still may be able to pull this off.
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sonotony

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 2:10 pm

Ryan Jones wrote:Almost - no sticks and OP wants two lavs.

I'd suggest posting this on a non-BM forum. There will likely be many other cameras you should consider before the BMD ones and given you have not much you may need to look at buying some stuff and renting a camera body.


I'm pretty sold on Blackmagic cameras and won't look at other options until I am convinced I can't do it here (not convinced yet). Yes I need sticks...

As far as lavs go, I might be able to get away with one wired one (perhaps two). This could bring down costs in that area.
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sonotony

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 2:16 pm

pacman829 wrote:I think he should be a lil more realistic

Also didn't mention the lighting .... :S

Or memory cards/ storage

Or filters (at the very least he'll need some ND's and IR filter for shooting outdoors)

Or Batteries ....

You're going to have to accept the fact that "acceptable" might not work for everything in your budget..



With that said,

Dont think shoulder rig ... think base plate and rods .. (less than $150-300 range)

If you can get your hands on something like an Indisystem Utracompact range and under
http://www.indisystem.com/ultracompact-1/

But literally just something to help you steady the footage a bit..

Wireless lavs are cool and convenient, but unless you have $1200 you wont get a decent pair.

The rodes boom kit that was mentioned should be fine for you , but you could always just get the rod from the kit and pick up a ntg2 + Tascam DR40

some decent lights or battery powered leds will run you from 150-250 bucks

I'd recommend some pocket cams if it werent for the issues they're having , but for now you're best bet is to find some decently priced used 5d mkii cams, or go with some gh2's


that'll leave you enough $$ left over for some decent glass, filters, and batteries



Thanks so much for the link!

Those are some of the least expensive rig accessories I have seen!

If they are good quality, I can definitely see me spending some money there.
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rick.lang

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 6:31 pm

sonotony wrote:... The thing is that one of the planned interviews is actually between two partners who are kind of interviewing each other in a conversation setting...

... It appears to me that a speedbooster can be used to basically double the quantity of primes in my bag. If I am starting out acquiring new lenses, would a speddbooster make sense, so I can plan to get two focal lengths out of each lens?

If you were to recommend two primes, what would they be (focal length, mount, brand, model... any ideas are helpful).

While I do not have any Canon lenses, I was considering a Canon speedbooster and getting some canon lenses...

Also, I have a guy who will sell me a Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8 L REALLY cheap. Would this be a decent zoom lens to use (not planning on using much zoom, but I need to get used to using all/mostly primes). Would I need to do anything to modify this lens to make it usable for filming?
...


For the interview, you have a choice of using one camera and keeping both people in frame or using two cameras as you suggest which likely would be best. You may consider buying the BMCC MFT and renting one more or buying two BMPCC cameras. Renting all your gear would keep you way under budget but I understand you want to begin to own more gear. Really if you feel you will often need two cameras, start with two BMPCC cameras if you can wait in line to get them. If time is important, buy a BMCC MFT off the shelf and rent a second one.

Speed Booster can 'double' your lens selections, but with two cameras, you need at least two lenses of course. If you planned on using a Speed Booster, it can work well to vary your selection of focal lengths. No one knows when the Metabones Speed Booster for active MFT mount to EF lenses will be available so it could be late this year. The rumours were it would come in August but that didn't happen and so I thought September, but it may not be an option if you plan to do your interviews this year! If available it would allow you to have some electronic control of your electronic EF lenses.

That Canon 70-200 f/2.8 could make sense in general, but for your interviews, it may be too long even when set to the shortest focal length and using the Speed Boost as it's minimum focal length is still longer than a 135mm lens effectively on the BMPCC. Because you need two cameras and two lenses, pass on the Speed Booster for now.

When you are confident which camera you will buy, then you can determine which lens is best for your interviews. To decide on a couple of lenses, you need to describe what frame you want your subjects in. What distance do you like your talent to be from the cameras? What height do you want the frame to have? For example, do you want the camera to be 10' from them and have them showing 3' in height (medium close up)? Then you would need a 24/25mm lens on the BMPCC or a 30/35mm lens on the BMCC. Or do you want them showing full height while sitting, say 5'? Then you would need 14mm lens on the BMPCC or 17/18mm on the BMCC.

Rick Lang
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sonotony

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostWed Sep 11, 2013 7:13 pm

rick.lang wrote:For the interview, you have a choice of using one camera and keeping both people in frame or using two cameras as you suggest which likely would be best. You may consider buying the BMCC MFT and renting one more or buying two BMPCC cameras. Renting all your gear would keep you way under budget but I understand you want to begin to own more gear. Really if you feel you will often need two cameras, start with two BMPCC cameras if you can wait in line to get them. If time is important, buy a BMCC MFT off the shelf and rent a second one.

Speed Booster can 'double' your lens selections, but with two cameras, you need at least two lenses of course. If you planned on using a Speed Booster, it can work well to vary your selection of focal lengths. No one knows when the Metabones Speed Booster for active MFT mount to EF lenses will be available so it could be late this year. The rumours were it would come in August but that didn't happen and so I thought September, but it may not be an option if you plan to do your interviews this year! If available it would allow you to have some electronic control of your electronic EF lenses.

That Canon 70-200 f/2.8 could make sense in general, but for your interviews, it may be too long even when set to the shortest focal length and using the Speed Boost as it's minimum focal length is still longer than a 135mm lens effectively on the BMPCC. Because you need two cameras and two lenses, pass on the Speed Booster for now.

When you are confident which camera you will buy, then you can determine which lens is best for your interviews. To decide on a couple of lenses, you need to describe what frame you want your subjects in. What distance do you like your talent to be from the cameras? What height do you want the frame to have? For example, do you want the camera to be 10' from them and have them showing 3' in height (medium close up)? Then you would need a 24/25mm lens on the BMPCC or a 30/35mm lens on the BMCC. Or do you want them showing full height while sitting, say 5'? Then you would need 14mm lens on the BMPCC or 17/18mm on the BMCC.

Rick Lang
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Thanks so much for all your advice Rick!

You have given me a lot to think about. I may be forced into the BMCC based on availability because I need to have my gear all set to go by the end of October. I can see using some sort of a rental solution for the interviews, because they will be planned locations/dates. The rest is a bit tricky, because I may not know far enough in advance when I may have an opportunity to do some additional filming... plus, I actually enjoy this stuff and I want to be able to experiment an learn without the need for rental.

For me, the big plus for the BMPCC is the small size. I like the idea of being able to pull out a relatively small setup in public places without causing a big scene. A couple months back, I was shooting a "spur-of-the-moment" video for a band that was performing at House Of Blues. The manager didn't care what I was doing when all he saw was my DSLR. The second he saw video equipment, he started talking about permits, presidential approval, and blessing of the Pope.

Also, I have four kids and I want something I can use at places like Sea World or Disneyland without freaking them out. If I look "too" professional, I think my family vacation footage will be a "no-go" I don't know... is it possible to look unobtrusive with a BMCC?

As far as the Canon 70-200 f/2.8 goes... that would be for field work and not interview footage.

If I were to declare (hypothetical) that I do not want to invest in another camera for another 5-6 years, but want to invest only in lenses and equipment, while continuing to improve my filming skills, would that have an impact on the camera you would recommend?
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rick.lang

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostThu Sep 12, 2013 6:11 pm

sonotony wrote:...
You have given me a lot to think about. I may be forced into the BMCC based on availability because I need to have my gear all set to go by the end of October. I can see using some sort of a rental solution for the interviews, because they will be planned locations/dates. The rest is a bit tricky, because I may not know far enough in advance when I may have an opportunity to do some additional filming... plus, I actually enjoy this stuff and I want to be able to experiment an learn without the need for rental.

For me, the big plus for the BMPCC is the small size. I like the idea of being able to pull out a relatively small setup in public places without causing a big scene. A couple months back, I was shooting a "spur-of-the-moment" video for a band that was performing at House Of Blues. The manager didn't care what I was doing when all he saw was my DSLR. The second he saw video equipment, he started talking about permits, presidential approval, and blessing of the Pope.

Also, I have four kids and I want something I can use at places like Sea World or Disneyland without freaking them out. If I look "too" professional, I think my family vacation footage will be a "no-go" I don't know... is it possible to look unobtrusive with a BMCC?

As far as the Canon 70-200 f/2.8 goes... that would be for field work and not interview footage.

If I were to declare (hypothetical) that I do not want to invest in another camera for another 5-6 years, but want to invest only in lenses and equipment, while continuing to improve my filming skills, would that have an impact on the camera you would recommend?


You can buy a BMCC without any problem now to experiment with and then rent a second one when you need it for the interviews. But if you really want a stealth camera, you have a far greater chance of shooting stealth video with a BMPCC. But I honestly don't think you will be able to order one and take delivery in a month. From what you have said, if it were my decision, I would order at least one BMPCC but shoot your important interviews with rental BMCC cameras. And give yourself a few days at least to become familiar with the camera and gear before you use it on your project.

Always a trade-off to be able to come to a decision. You can make that decision, no one else. Nice you have a rental option on the BMCC. But it sounds like your guerrilla video fits best on the BMPCC. I also like to buy a camera that will serve me well for five years but it can be hard to predict. Easier to think in a two year frame and the cameras are not so costly that you won't be able to make a change after a couple of years if you really wanted something newer. I'm sure raw and ProRes 4:2:2 (HQ) will fit that bill for either camera.

I am planning for the BMPC4K with global shutter as having the best chance of lasting five years or more to deliver high image quality 2K. But at the rate of technological change in cameras, that may be unrealistic. It could be significantly outdated in a year or two! And the BMCC at half the price can deliver 2K today. The greatest unknown to me is in sensor development. A new discovery tomorrow could revolutionize the sensors we use in cinema cameras within two years. But so be it, we have to use what we have today, and not fret about the unknown. Best to concentrate on making the best use of what we have and that will put you in the best place for tomorrow.

Rick Lang
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goodluckdesigns

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Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostThu Sep 12, 2013 11:42 pm

sonotony wrote:Hello All!

I need to get set up to do some basic, yet professional looking film work. Some will be for projection on a large movie screen, some for DVD's and some for HD web video. The problem is that I only have about $5,000 to spend (I can go as high as $6,000) and I'm almost starting from scratch.

Until recently, most of the work I have done has been is web or DVD based. My products (training, promo & music videos, etc) have typically involved either professional film crews or heavy use of animation or post production processing to the extent that raw footage quality has rarely become an issue. In many cases where I have been able to use a professional camera crew, I have supplemented projects with purchased stock footage and/or used my JVC Enviro (~$1,000 consumer HD camcorder) to fill in some small pieces.

I am currently putting together a documentary as part of a larger project and need the documentary portion to be as high quality as possible using the ~$5,000 equipment budget available for this portion of the project. No, I am not a professional film maker, just a professional who needs to make a film. However, if this movie turns out well, it should afford me the opportunity to do more film work within my projects, which is what I would really like to do more of. I want my finished product to be good enough to show on a movie screen. I'm great with post production stuff and I'm a fast learner for the rest. I just want to make sure I have the optimal combination of equipment to get me where I want to go. Is this even possible for 5,000? If so, I'd appreciate any ideas.

With the exception of some Nikon camera lenses (low budget lens solution?), a Zoom H4N, 3 cheap handheld mics, 2 unreliable lav mics, my JVC Enviro with 4 bad pixels, and 3 cheap tripods, I've got nothing. I need to be able to film studio style interviews and location footage including some scenery. I'm not sure what to do about the interview footage because I want to use two camera angles. Is there an ultra cheap option for interview cam #2? Like I said, I don't know how possible this is. At a minimum, It looks like I will need:

two acceptable quality lav mics

one acceptable quality boom setup

shoulder/handheld rig setup

tripod setup

wide angle lens

telephoto/zoom lens

solution for interview cam #2

I'm not sure if I should get the BMCC-MFT, BMCC-EF, or BMPCC. I think the first two will allow me greater editing flexibility, but do I need the cheaper camera to afford better glass? I greatly appreciate any tips, hints, resources, ideas or suggestions! THANKS!


I am going to take a shot at making you an admittingly cheap but effective setup that will keep you under that 5k budget!

1: Black Magic Cinema Camera EF $2,000.00 (adorama)

2: CAMTREE Pilot Extreme Shoulder Kit $737.00 (available at CineCity)
[includes rig/mattebox/followfocus/handle]

3: Zoom H4N $270.00 (amazon)

4: Rode VideoMic Pro VMP Shotgun Microphone $229.00 (amazon)

5: Davis & Sanford ProElite 75mm Tripod w/ Fluid Head $540.00 (adorama)

6: Canon EF 28mm f2.8 Wide Angle $550.00 (adorama)

7: Canon EF 24-70mm f4 $709.00 (adorama)

Now, I know that I missed the Wireless Lav BUT realistically, what wireless lav kit can you add to keep it at $5,000..

All the items I listed came in at $5,035.00 w/o tax. I know tax would add quite a bit, but I would suggest making a friend that lives in Delaware! All jokes aside, you could do some good work with those 7 items. I would suggest getting an extra $1k from the investor and adding some SSD, a better 70-200, and a used wireless lav kit.


hopefully this at least adds some insight into your search!
Good Luck Designs
Offline

Paul Kapp

  • Posts: 609
  • Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 7:43 am

Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostFri Sep 13, 2013 11:32 am

Offline

Jon Braeley

  • Posts: 155
  • Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2013 8:50 pm

Re: Best Setup for $5,000?

PostFri Sep 13, 2013 12:47 pm

I would not include a rig/mattebox/followfocus....

Spend the money on improving the quality of your movie where it counts and get better lens and mic choices. In fact on a low budget good audio counts much more because bad audio is always the sign of a low budget.

Save money and buy a good monopod like the Manfrotto 562B-1 instead of a rig.
Empty Mind Films: http://emptymindfilms.com

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