only one lens for portrait video work

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changeme1

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only one lens for portrait video work

PostMon Dec 17, 2012 8:40 pm

I am still deciding on the mounts, and I am thinking of the MFT because I love this lens:
Voigtlander 25mm f/0.95 Nokton Manual Focus Lens for Micro 4/3 Mount
I am only using this camera for portrait video work -- are there any drawbacks that anyone knows about using this lens on this camera -- I like the manual focus ECT... I just do not want any compromise in quality and would go with a zeiss 55mm if there was to be...

Thanks in advance for any help!
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Peter J. DeCrescenzo

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Re: only one lens for portrait video work

PostMon Dec 17, 2012 8:54 pm

If you love how that 25mm lens looks when used on a MFT camera for portrait work, then you may well like using it on a BMCC, too, since the FOV will be similar (but not exactly the same), and the perspective distortion will be identical.

Most people, myself included, prefer the flatter perspective distortion that longer lenses provide -- such as 35mm, 50mm, or 85mm -- for portrait work.

But these are aesthetic choices. Use whichever focal length you prefer, and depending on the sensor/format size, move the camera/subject as necessary (in or out) to achieve the desired framing.

Cheers.
http://www.peterdv.com
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Guisphoto

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Re: only one lens for portrait video work

PostMon Dec 17, 2012 9:12 pm

Personally I prefer longer lenses for portrait. 85, 100 or 150mm. For your case, some good vintage cinema lenses are a fantastic option. Also a Zeiss 55mm with the BMC sensor will work nicely for portrait.
I would go to a medium telephoto and a T4.5 aperture
Alberto Ros
http://vimeo.com/guis
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changeme1

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Re: only one lens for portrait video work

PostMon Dec 17, 2012 9:25 pm

I like the look of a standard 50mm too... would there be any distortion on a 3/4s? I like more of a classic look -- also has anyone used the camera? I have never bought a video camera (most all my work is done with an old rolleiflex) but I have just recently involved myself with portrait video work... I was told that the voigtlander would be the best for this work. Are there other recommendations for a manual focus fixed portrait lens? I know that it is a personal choice, but I also know that certain lenses work better on certain cameras -- and, given this camera's sensor, aspect ratio, ECT, I was thinking that this would be particularly true for this camera.
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Peter J. DeCrescenzo

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Re: only one lens for portrait video work

PostTue Dec 18, 2012 12:49 am

changeme1 wrote:I like the look of a standard 50mm too... would there be any distortion on a 3/4s? I like more of a classic look -- also has anyone used the camera? I have never bought a video camera (most all my work is done with an old rolleiflex) but I have just recently involved myself with portrait video work... I was told that the voigtlander would be the best for this work. Are there other recommendations for a manual focus fixed portrait lens? I know that it is a personal choice, but I also know that certain lenses work better on certain cameras -- and, given this camera's sensor, aspect ratio, ECT, I was thinking that this would be particularly true for this camera.


I'm not sure what you're asking.

The perspective distortion of a 25mm lens (or any lens) stays the same regardless of the imaging format. A 25mm or any relatively wide lens tends to exaggerate features of a face closet to the lens, such as the nose, chin, etc.

perspective distortion.jpg
perspective distortion.jpg (147.9 KiB) Viewed 1971 times

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspectiv ... hotography)#Examples

Longer lenses, such as 50mm, 85mm and greater tend to flatten the perspective distortion in a desirable way for portraits of people.

These issues aren't specific to the EF or MFT mount versions of the BMCC.

Choose a focal length (perspective distortion) you prefer, and frame your shots accordingly.

You may find this FOV comparator helpful:
http://www.abelcine.com/fov/
http://www.peterdv.com
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changeme1

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Re: only one lens for portrait video work

PostTue Dec 18, 2012 1:53 am

Thank you so much for your input, I have decided on a Zeiss 85mm f/1.4 Planar T. This will be perfect for my purpose and production.

Best,

Ben
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FredP

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Re: only one lens for portrait video work

PostTue Dec 18, 2012 3:35 am

Ben,

If you really want to see how different focal lengths can make a face look, check out this series of photos:

http://stepheneastwood.com/tutorials/le ... ippage.htm

It's the same, quite attractive woman photographed using lenses from 350mm to 19mm. These happen to have been shot on full frame 35mm (AKA VistaVision in the film world), but the same applies regardless of imaging size.

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