How do you expose with BMPCC?

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Roberto Mettifogo

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How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 10:34 pm

How do you guys expose with the BMPCC when filming RAW Film ?

With landscapes I expose to the right (ETTR) just looking the clouds or brighter parts of the image but should we ETTR even when the brightest part of the subject is not pure white nor almost white ?

In a night scene for example, when you have a mix of car lights and people around, do you ETTR the lights ? the people? in between ? in these situations I find auto iris quite unuseful, but with light reflections on metal objects it's unuseful also in daylight.

So far I use a smallHD DP6 false colours to check my black and white clipping, and I try to keep the area of interest in the middle of the two...

Thanks
Last edited by Roberto Mettifogo on Mon Mar 24, 2014 10:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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AdrianSierkowski

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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 10:41 pm

I don't ETTR, I meter the scene @ 800 ASA, I look at my contrast range, and I choose the best stop for the project. Sometimes Erring to over expose a stop to protect information in my shadows, sometimes erring to under expose by a stop or two to get rid of said information in my shadows. I don't much worry about the highlights with 13 stops dynamic range. I treat it much like I would film stock.
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Roberto Mettifogo

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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 10:43 pm

AdrianSierkowski wrote:I don't ETTR, I meter the scene @ 800 ASA, I look at my contrast range, and I choose the best stop for the project. Sometimes Erring to over expose a stop to protect information in my shadows, sometimes erring to under expose by a stop or two to get rid of said information in my shadows. I don't much worry about the highlights with 13 stops dynamic range. I treat it much like I would film stock.


so you shoot everythin at 800 ? (native iso?)
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AdrianSierkowski

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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 10:47 pm

Yes. I do so on every camera, for the most part. If I need less light, that's why they invented ND filters. Sometimes, for a certain look I may abuse a camera. And if I'm on film, I often over-expose by 2/3rd of a stop on higher ASA stocks, or I'll be planning for some kind of photochemical trick. I rate the digital cameras at what they rate at. Sometimes it's slightly off of manufacturers recommendations. Some other special times, I may hop to a lower ASA to get more shadow detail, or a higher one to get more highlight (primarily true on Reds, for example), but that's a special case as opposed to a always do.
Some may like to shoot at 400 ASA, harkening back to the days when we'd use -3DB gain on cameras. I haven't yet played 'round with that yet.
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Roberto Mettifogo

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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 10:49 pm

AdrianSierkowski wrote:Yes. I do so on every camera, for the most part. If I need less light, that's why they invented ND filters. Sometimes, for a certain look I may abuse a camera. And if I'm on film, I often over-expose by 2/3rd of a stop on higher ASA stocks, or I'll be planning for some kind of photochemical trick. I rate the digital cameras at what they rate at. Sometimes it's slightly off of manufacturers recommendations. Some other special times, I may hop to a lower ASA to get more shadow detail, or a higher one to get more highlight (primarily true on Reds, for example), but that's a special case as opposed to a always do.
Some may like to shoot at 400 ASA, harkening back to the days when we'd use -3DB gain on cameras. I haven't yet played 'round with that yet.

thanks
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Dustin Boswell

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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 11:03 pm

Generally you want to expose to whats important to the scene.

The rules of proper exposure are very much so based off of a desired result (the rule I've followed is that so long as something in the scene is properly exposed - it is a properly exposed shot), You may want to underexpose a background element or use a cookie to give a pattern of underexposed areas (shadows, bars, leaves, etc). For example, Image
-Skyfall, Dir. Sam Mendes, Cinematography by Roger Deakins (this was Nominated for Best Cinematography)

This image does have areas of Underexposure and blown out highlights from the window - however the small portion of Bond's Face that is in focus is properly exposed - hence the image is properly exposed.

Personally, I try to slightly overexpose the highlights @ 800 ASA (it's easier to take light out of a shot in post than it is to add more light in). 800ASA from my experience is at the point where its sensitive enough for controlled lighting situations without too much grain/noise.

The best way to judge exposure is through a light meter honestly (as monitors & LCDs may not be correctly calibrated) - however if you are not in a situation where a light meter is available it's best to still slightly overexpose.
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Roberto Mettifogo

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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 11:06 pm

thanks, unfortunately using metabones adapters I don't have reference on the fstop used but your suggestion is basically what I do now, except for the 800, so far I used lowest iso as possible, will do some tests then.
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Re: How do you expose with BMPCC?

PostMon Mar 24, 2014 11:18 pm

robbie75vr wrote:thanks, unfortunately using metabones adapters I don't have reference on the fstop used but your suggestion is basically what I do now, except for the 800, so far I used lowest iso as possible, will do some tests then.


I've found that using a 1/3rd f-stop scale you can link the markings on the Metabones adapter to the markings on most of my Nikon lenses, there are 7 marks from wide open to closed on the metabones adapter and usually 7 different stops on the lenses.

From that, take 1 2/3 stops away from what it says on the lens, and link them together.
Hence: If I stop down to an f22 on my Sigma 18mm it becomes an f13 which corresponds to the 7 on the adapter.

You can also still use the Aperture ring (if your lens has one) on the lens over the Metabones adapter and just take the 1 2/3 away from that number to get the real number.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-number

I personally took that page printed it out, and cut off the typical 1/3 scale and scotch tape it to a my camera bag/case so I can remember easier.
"Fix it in Prep"- 1st A.D.'s Motto
Dustin Boswell
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