Camera Native Gammut

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Andrew Hunter

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Camera Native Gammut

PostMon Sep 24, 2012 4:19 pm

I was wondering what the gamut of the BMCC is?

Is there an advantage to grading material in P3 vs in Rec709 assuming the ultimate intent of outputting to DCP?
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John Brawley

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Re: Camera Native Gammut

PostWed Sep 26, 2012 10:27 pm

The camera definitely has a much wider gamut than 709, and I think it's one of the best and most under-realised advantages the camera offers over other similar priced cameras.

It has a very wide colour gamut AND a way of recording it in a way that means you can use it !

I'm not that familiar with colour correction from a user point of view, but my understanding is not to grade in the actual space (like 709 or p3) but to monitor in that space while you grade in the native space. It might be better to ask this question in the post section.

jb
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Nick Bedford

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Re: Camera Native Gammut

PostWed Sep 26, 2012 11:21 pm

John Brawley wrote:The camera definitely has a much wider gamut than 709, and I think it's one of the best and most under-realised advantages the camera offers over other similar priced cameras.

It has a very wide colour gamut AND a way of recording it in a way that means you can use it !

I'm not that familiar with colour correction from a user point of view, but my understanding is not to grade in the actual space (like 709 or p3) but to monitor in that space while you grade in the native space. It might be better to ask this question in the post section.

jb


As far as I've read before, raw has no colour space itself. It's not until you start processing it that the software brings it into a colour space like ProPhotoRGB, AdobeRGB or sRGB. At least in Lightroom, Photoshop and such. Not sure what Resolve works in.
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Andrew Hunter

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Re: Camera Native Gammut

PostThu Sep 27, 2012 1:19 pm

Nick Bedford wrote:As far as I've read before, raw has no colour space itself. It's not until you start processing it that the software brings it into a colour space like ProPhotoRGB, AdobeRGB or sRGB. At least in Lightroom, Photoshop and such. Not sure what Resolve works in.


Hey Nick,

Raw most definitely has a color space, though it is specific to the camera. It not one that is directly viewable or necessarily complete, but it is a color space. What I am not sure is if it's a scene-referred space or not.

As a color space consists of three components, chromacity primaries, white point and gamma. Of those, the latter two are configurable during the raw processing step.

What would be awesome is a block diagram from BMD explaining the signal chain in Resolve.

As I understand it, the raw settings in resolve allow you to select how to transform from the CameraRGB primaries into either Rec709 (same primaries as sRGB), P3 and BMD Film. At the same time you also select the how to transform from the scene whitepoint to the display color space whitepoint along with a chosen gamma.

After that, all of the grading takes place in the chosen color space through to output.

Based on John's comments it would appear that grading in P3 could offer some potential benefits for a DCP output.

Cheers,

Andrew

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